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AMALGAM OR COMPOSITE RESTORATIONS

POST-OPERATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY.

Sometimes the after effects of treatment are quite minimal, so not all of these instructions may apply, common sense will often dictate what you should do.  It is our desire that your recovery be as smooth and pleasant as possible.  Following these instructions will assist you, but if you have questions about your progress, please call the office where you had treatment.  Please try to call during office hours, however, if an emergency exists contact the doctors at home. Calling during office hours will afford a faster response. 

DAY OF TREATMENT

FIRST HOUR

Do not eat for the first hour after you leave our office if amalgam (silver) was used.  This will allow time for the restoration to set and for the anesthetic to wear off (if any was used).  If you have composite (tooth colored) restorations, they are completely set when you leave our office.  Children should be closely monitored until the  anesthetic wears off.  Due to the unusual feeling of the anesthetic, many children will chew the inside of their lips, cheeks, or tongue, causing sores in their mouth, which later become very painful.

DIET

Eat any nourishing food that can be taken with comfort.  Avoid extremely hot or cold foods, because the restoration may be sensitive to temperatures at first.  Sensitivity, especially to cold, is common for a few days following a dental restoration.  Usually, the deeper the cavity the more sensitive the tooth will be.  It is important not to skip meals!  If you take nourishment regularly, you will feel better, gain strength, have less discomfort and heal faster.  If you are a diabetic, maintain your normal eating habits as much as possible and follow instructions from us or from your physician regarding your insulin schedule.

EXERCISE CARE

Do not disturb the treatment area today.  DO NOT rinse vigorously or probe the area with any objects or your fingers.  You may brush your teeth gently. 

PAIN

Unfortunately, most treatment is accompanied by some degree of discomfort.  You may have to take an analgesic such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen sodium (Aleve) or acetaminophen.  Analgesics with anti-inflammatory effects such as ibuprofen, Aleve and aspirin often give better relief than acetaminophen.  Sensitivity to temperature is also possible.  It is difficult to predict which symptoms, if any, you may experience and to what extent.  Sensitivity is usually most noticeable the first 12-24 hours after the anesthetic wears off.  If you have any severe pain please call the office to schedule an appointment.  The gum tissue could have been irritated during the procedure and may be sore for a few days.  You may also have some mild discomfort at the injection site.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SECOND AND THIRD DAYS

MOUTH RINSES

Keeping your mouth clean after treatment will promote better healing.  Use a one-quarter teaspoon of salt dissolved in an 8 ounce glass of warm water and gently rinse with portions of the solution, taking five minutes to use the entire glassful.  Repeat as often as you like, but at least two or three times daily for the next five days. DO NOT rinse with hydrogen peroxide.

BRUSHING

Begin your normal oral hygiene routine as soon as possible after treatment.  Some temperature sensitivity may not permit brushing of all areas with cold water, but please make an effort to clean your teeth within the bounds of comfort, by using lukewarm water.

TOOTH CARE

After the restoration is placed there may be an adjustment period for a few days.  This will allow for your tongue to get used to the new restoration in your mouth.  If you feel the bite is not correctly balanced (one side hits before the other) be sure to call for an appointment for a simple adjustment. If this is not taken care of it can cause pain in your tooth or teeth, from bruising due to constant pressure on one area of the mouth.

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